Robert E. Lee statue at Duke Chapel vandalized

Ausiliatrice Cristiano
Agosto 20, 2017

They also argue that removing the statues could have unintended consequences. The statue was a symbol of Hussein's bloody regime.

Democrats have denounced Trump for blaming "both sides" for deadly protests in Charlottesville, Virginia, and, more recently, for defending Confederate monuments.

Beyond blatant expressions of white nationalism, violence, and racism that these groups have voiced in their rallies in Charlottesville, a major catalyst for their rallies was the city's decision to remove a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee from Emancipation Park (previously Lee Park) in the middle of downtown.

Setting aside the significant cost (in New Orleans, just removing the monuments carried a bill of over $2 million) of moving and preserving what in many cases are hollow mass-produced statues, the question remains: If we were to lovingly "contextualize" the many hundreds of Confederate monuments that remain in the United States, what would that exhibition look like?

To compare the leaders of the Confederacy to Saddam Hussein might be a bridge too far for some, who would describe Hussein as a clear tyrant and murderer of his own people. They were enabled by a Democratic Republic that professed a love for freedom but fought for the preservation of human bondage. Only 30 percent say they approve of the decision. Eight people have now been arrested over Monday's toppling.

But they are seen by many Americans as symbols of racism and glorifications of the Confederate defense of slavery in the Civil War, fueling the debate over race and politics in America.

During an administrative meeting Wednesday evening, August 16, Helena Mayor Jim Smith said city officials will wait to decide what will happen to the monument after it is removed.

"And so here comes the symbols to remind us of a period of time when we were oppressed, when we were enslaved and when we had no voice, when we had no vote, nearly a reminder of our place in society and to keep us in that position", Whitehead said. But the streets named for them still fall, technically, on the military's property. Historical evidence certainly suggests the answer is very clear: The Confederacy and the monuments dedicated to it always stood for white supremacy, although much of USA is coming to terms with it.

Another in Wadesboro, erected 40 years after the war, reads in part: "THEY BELIEVED OUR SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS AND OUR RIGHT OF LOCAL SELF-GOVERNMENT IMPERILED BY THE AVOWED HOSTILITY OF A LARGE SECTION OF THE UNION...."

So why exactly are some people opposed to their removal? Confederate veterans are buried at the cemetery, many with a version of the rebel battle flag on their gravesite. They stand, plain and simple, as symbols of hatred and oppression. "After the war was over, he was the first to say let's lay down our arms and let's bring this nation back together to a more flawless union".

ATLANTA (AP) - President Donald Trump's widely criticized response to white supremacist violence in Virginia has left Democrats in a quandary: how to seize the moral high ground without getting sucked into a politically perilous culture war.

"Most monuments were created during the Jim Crow era to stand in opposition to racial equality", according to the Atlanta History Center, formerly the Atlanta Historical Society.

Activists expressed interest and support for removing statues honoring Confederate soldiers and the MS state flag, which includes a Confederate symbol, after the June 2015 massacre in Charleston, South Carolina, where Dylann Roof, a white supremacist who was photographed with Confederate memorabilia, killed nine black Americans during a church prayer service.

Calls to change the name of Lee Avenue and its compatriot, Stonewall Jackson Avenue, began only earlier this year, when U.S. Representative Yvette Clarke told The New Yorker it was time (both Lee and Jackson had served at Fort Hamilton decades before the war started).

The President is wrong. It isn't about preserving history. I mean, it wasn't even a state during the Civil War, and this fountain wasn't erected until 1916. Commemorations in public spaces should recall the past and also provide inspiration and hope for the future.

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