United Kingdom unveils post-Brexit plan to cut funding for terror groups

Bruno Cirelli
Agosto 2, 2017

Britain now negotiates and imposes non-United Nations global sanctions through European Union laws.

The UK has set out plans to increase its powers in levying sanctions against terror groups once it leaves the European Union in 2019.

The proposed Sanctions Bill will ensure the United Kingdom has the necessary post-Brexit legal powers to "cut off funding for terrorists by making it easier to freeze assets and block access to bank accounts", as well as "greater flexibility in choosing when and how to introduce new measures", the Foreign and Commonwealth Office said in a statement.

MINISTERS paved the way for Brexit by unveiling greater powers to issue sanctions - and cut off terrorist funding.

The current system requires the Government to "reasonably believe" someone is or has been involved in terrorism and that the asset freezes are "necessary to protect the public".

"These new powers will help us keep the British public safer from terrorist attacks by keeping money out of the hands of those wishing to cause us harm", treasury minister Stephen Barclay said.

Today's plans - which also call for an annual review of sanctions and give those affected the right to challenge - come after a nine-week consultation on the UK's system after it leaves the EU.

"Our counter terrorist financing proposals will make it easier for law enforcement and Government to impose sanctions on those that present a threat to our national or worldwide security".

At the moment, the United Kingdom implements more than 30 sanctions regimes, including against countries like Russia, North Korea and Iran as well as terror groups such as Islamic State and al Qaida.

The measures form part of a new law which will create the UK's post-Brexit sanctions regime.

"Our counter terrorist financing proposals will make it easier for law enforcement and government to impose sanctions on those that present a threat to our national or worldwide security".

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