Britain eyes Brexit deal 'like no other in history'

Bruno Cirelli
Giugno 20, 2017

After nearly a year of waffling, Britain on Monday finally opens negotiations with its European Union counterparts about leaving the bloc, with the final outcome, due in 2019, as important as it now seems unpredictable.

"We must first tackle the uncertainties caused by Brexit - first for citizens but also for the beneficiaries of the European Union policies and for the impact on borders, in particular Ireland", Barnier told reporters at the start of the talks.

Barnier said he hopes there would be a "constructive" opening to the talks, which will lead to the UK's exit in March 2019.

Brexit Secretary David Davis has said Britain will seek "a deal that works in the best interests of all citizens" in Brexit talks getting under way in Brussels.

Brexit Secretary David Davis arrived in Brussels to launch talks he hoped would produce a "new, deep and special partnership" with the EU. Only when there is "sufficient progress" does the European Union want to look at creating a new relationship with Britain on things like trade and migration.

Davis, a prominent tough-talking figure in the "Leave" campaign, sounded a positive note too, saying "there is more that unites us than divides us". A snap election early this month, in which Prime Minister Theresa May lost her majority, only added to the problems.

A year after Britons shocked the continent by voting on June 23 to cut loose from their main export market, debate within Prime Minister Theresa May's cabinet on precisely what kind of trading relationship to pursue has perplexed European Union leaders, who warn time is tight to agree terms before Britain leaves in 2019.

"The problem is that while the United Kingdom voted for Brexit, there is no clear structure of what were the most important elements that the negotiating team should aim to achieve".

THE Queen's Speech will be ditched next year to allow parliament more time to scrutinise new Brexit laws.

The groups say they accept the result of last year's EU Referendum but have come together "to urge the Government to put the economy first".

Anxious by mass immigration and loss of sovereignty, Britain previous year voted to end its decades-old membership of the 28-nation bloc in a shock referendum result.

Monday's talks however are likely to focus on the practical details of timings for the coming months, with the big, divisive issues left aside for now, officials said.

Yet many in Brussels fear that London has no real strategy, with May under pressure at home, still trying to close a deal with a conservative Northern Ireland party to stay in power, and facing criticism for her handling of the aftermath of a devastating tower block fire.

The Queen's Speech sets out details of extensive UK Government legislation required to put Brexit into effect, expected to include a Great Repeal Bill bringing European Union laws and regulations onto the British statute book, as well as bills on issues including immigration and customs. Instead, he will stress the importance of a "pragmatic" approach to negotiating transition periods and avoiding a cliff edge.

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